Ukrainian Dumplings (Varenyky) with Cabbage and Bacon
It's never too late to learn to make a new type of dumpling.
Roasted Brussels Sprouts with Oranges, Pistachios and Pomegranate Molasses
Welcome to fall.
Spicy Korean Seafood & Tofu Stew with Spinach (Soondubu Jigae)
Wake up your senses with this nose-tingling pot of goodness.
Winter Squash Wontons, Two Ways
Make a sweet-savory classic wonton, or a creamy ravioli with squash.
Spice-Crusted Cod with Beets and Lemon-Yogurt Dressing
Forget breadcrumbs; crush some whole spices for a crunchy, flavorful crust.
Roasted Root Vegetables with Miso-Shallot Dressing
Wake up winter roots with a tangy dressing.
Caramelized Onion & Kale Soup
Soupe a l'oignon, meet the crisper drawer.
Curried White Beans and Kale with Sungold Tomatoes
An easy way to add flavor to the old beans, greens and grains formula, using Brooklyn Delhi's new Indian simmer sauce
Carrot Salad with Preserved Lemon
Make your own preserved lemons—or not—to use in this simple yet flavorful side.
Three Cup Chicken Wings
Condense the savory flavors of San Bei Ji or Three Cup Chicken into a thick sauce for wings.
Roasted Hakurei Turnips with Israeli Couscous Salad
Use the turnip greens to toss into the salad, too.
Tacos de Lengua
We all can use some more tongue in our pots.
Pasta with Clams, Kale and Breadcrumbs
The liquor from just-opened clams are practically the only—and easiest—sauce you need in your pasta.
Leftover Turkey Congee
Shred up your turkey, whip up a ginger-scallion sauce, and top a bowl of creamy rice with it.

Latest Blog Posts

Ukrainian Cabbage Dumplings (Varenyky), and a Confession
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The holiday season has arrived, and that means a lot of dumpling-making from November through February to my family and friends. Although no time of the year is spared of this tradition, we really bring it on the nights before Thanksgiving and Christmas: at least two types of fillings, stacks of round wrappers, and often, square, yellow wonton wrappers for boiled wontons and their filling are brought out onto the... Read More

Curried White Beans and Kale with Cherry Tomatoes
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Beans, greens and grains: Remember this formula, and you will be fed for a lifetime in a very healthy, inexpensive and earth-friendly way. And it’ll never get old. You simply cannot exhaust the shapes, sizes and varieties of beans, grains and green vegetables alone (but have fun geeking out over heirloom beans and trying!). And there’s no limit to how you can prepare these—from black beans and rice to daal to minestrone,... Read More

Easy Like Sunday Sauce
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Call me a culinary thief, but I love cooking passed-down family recipes from other peoples’ families. I say that with a bit of mischievousness because usually, the recipe-writer—the nonna, auntie, etc.—had shared their recipe with someone whom they love, but they probably never imagined that it would one day be used by a total stranger, me. It’s kind of thrilling. Read More

Winter Squash Fritters with Walnuts and Feta
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Say you want something savory, crispy, and fried—to start out a dinner, perhaps. Or to round out a more wholesome meal. Or to bring to a party, instead of a bag of chips (which I’ve done many times out of sheer enthusiasm for good potato chips and its place and purpose, and find no shame in). But let’s say you have time to roll up your sleeves in something... Read More

Gobo (Burdock Root) Gratin
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When faced with a vegetable that you’ve never cooked before, you can always try making it a proxy for a something that you have. Especially if that vegetable is as familiar as a potato, and the preparation is as adaptable as a gratin. Nowadays, we tend to think of this dish as a creamy, cheesy casserole of sliced potatoes. But you can cook anything in the oven with a sprinkling of... Read More

Sticky Rice Stuffed Cabbage
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Food tucked inside individual portion-sized packages—it’s a formula that has served many favorite dishes of mine. From dumplings to tamales, these dishes are often clever ways to stretch or use up scraps and leftovers. Because yesterday’s stale starches and bits of proteins are much more charming dressed up in a wrapper. This dish is a cross between the minced mushroom and meat-laden Chinese sticky rice that I grew up... Read More

Spicy Chili Crisp and Peanut Ice Cream (with Spicy Chili Crisp Peanut Sesame Brittle)
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Sweets with a salty, savory hint have always been around—think the pinch of salt in a chocolate-chip cookie recipe. But in recent years, it’s become a selling point. From “salty” caramel to “salted” chocolate chip cookies, the emphasis has really moved over to the savory side of the equation in sweets. And, we’ve seen plenty of sweets with a spicy kick as well. For me, the worlds of spicy, savory and sweet all came... Read More

Apples, Peaches, Pumpkin Pie
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I’ve had an earworm for the last few weeks. Ever since finding a record called “Apples, Peaches, Pumpkin Pie” by Jay & the Techniques, the title track has been playing in my head nearly constantly. It’s a great song—have a listen. This pie is not what the song is actually about, but I just couldn’t shake the idea of making it. In an uncanny confluence of new seasonal fruits and old... Read More

Corn on the Cob with Gochujang Mayo
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There’s really nothing that parallels that burst of succulent kernels when sweet corn is in season, late summer. Just the noise of biting them straight off the cob—often uncontrollably fast—is a soundtrack to the season. Not to diminish the enjoyment of pure corn on the cob, maybe slicked with butter, but I’ve been slathering those juicy ears with a combo like this all summer: mayo mixed with some kind of spicy sauce. This... Read More

Caesar Salad with Seared Scallops
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You don’t have to reinvent the wheel for a meal. Especially not in the summer, when it’s often hot and humid enough to make the stove a scary place. I seem to wind up with so many heads of lettuce in the summer, too—from my CSA or farmers markets or friends—that I have to play a version of pin the tail on the donkey with them that involves lettuce heads,... Read More

Chicken and Basil Wontons
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This wonton filling is proudly—if improbably—fashioned after san bei ji or Three Cup Chicken. This is one of the ultimate dishes from Taiwan, and one I love enough to try to twist into different forms any day. It starts with a deeply satisfying blend of soy sauce, sesame oil and rice wine (the eponymous “three cups”), and it’s splashed with copious aromatics—garlic, ginger and basil. I wanted to get its zingy,... Read More

Asparagus and Feta Quiche
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It may be the twilight hour for spring but I’m savoring as much fresh asparagus as I can get. You know those ethereally green, snappy twigs of juicy, crispy, woody goodness won’t be in season for much longer here in the Northeast. If you’ve been simply grilling them like I have been a lot these short pre-summer nights—or perhaps enjoying them raw in a lightly dressed salad—then you may... Read More

Reason For Not Eating Out #64: To Cook Things You Didn’t Think Were Possible
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Cooking is empowering. And it’s unique, in that this simple exercise provides you with one of the few daily necessities for survival—food. You can’t say that for going to the gym, or writing a brilliant essay, as empowering as those activities may be. It’s not always the case that whipping up a plate of dinner gives you a great sense of personal accomplishment. But when you cook something that... Read More

Apple and Roasted Hakurei Turnip Salad with Hot Honey-Mustard Dressing
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I’m a big fan of two-ingredient “salads”—if you’ll allow me to call them that. What makes a salad a salad? It’s not uncommon to see a “tomato salad” with just tomato and dressing. So is the imperative on fresh vegetables? (Not so! What about chicken, egg or grain-based salads?) Does it need to be cold? (No! Warm or room-temperature salads are a typical Moroccan side, like with carrots, for instance.) To... Read More

Braised Short Ribs with Red Wine, Tomatoes and Rutabaga
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I’m convinced that big chunks of root vegetables are the perfect complement for rich, hearty winter stews—they absorb all their juices like savory sponges while adding to the complexity of the sauce. Even if nontraditional, they can make a stealthy starring role in such venerable cold-weather, long-cooked staples as cassoulet—with or without the addition of meat. Or wine-braised short ribs. Read More

Miso Chicken Soup with Leeks, Cabbage, Shiitake Mushrooms and Radishes, with Radish Chips
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Who says you can’t put miso in chicken soup? Or chicken in miso soup? I get it—miso paste is a great plant-based source of protein and flavor. Chicken soup, made from flesh and bone, needs little help in those departments. But I couldn’t decide. When it comes to winter slurping satisfaction, both chicken soup and miso soup are such all-time comforts. If you like both those soups, too, they... Read More

Steamed Whole Fish With Spicy Black Bean Sauce
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Growing up, pretty much any time I ate fish it was prepared in one of two ways: steamed whole, then drenched with julienned ginger, scallions and soy sauce. Or, pan-fried whole, then drenched with spicy, garlicky bean sauce. Later on, I would grow to love dipping fried fish sticks into ketchup and savoring every juicy bite of a Cajun-seasoned catfish fillet. But at the beginning, it was all about... Read More

Philly Cheesesteak Dumplings
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What doesn’t taste good in a dumpling? Good question. Another: Is there any festive occasion whose theme can’t be dumpli-fied? I say there is definitely not. So when Super Bowl LII weekend was approaching, and I realized that one of the teams playing was the Philadelphia Eagles, I decided to make dumplings with a filling a la the city’s signature hoagie. Cheesesteak Dumplings aren’t that different from Cheeseburger Dumplings, after all. Read More

Roasted Sweet Potato and Quinoa Salad with Chickpeas and Preserved Lemon
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There’s evil starches, then there’s good-for-you starches, from a modern-day health perspective. White potatoes are roundly shunned as one of those bad, rotten, festering ones of the bunch, bound to metastasize into a gummy tube of fat around your waistline. Refined white flours are bad, too, if you can even eat them without experiencing painful gluten intolerances! Now, I will never call either of these types of food “bad” entirely,... Read More

New England Clam Chowder
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Let’s start off a year of fewer regrets. It’s 2018, a good time to start getting things done! It’s about time to do things that have long been neglected and put off, like a laundry list of—well, laundry is one of them. And for some reason, I have never made New England-style clam chowder before. Let’s knock this one off and keep on going strong. Read More

Reason For Not Eating Out #63: Because It’s Cold Outside
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The lyrics to the classic wintry song, “Baby, It’s Cold Outside,” did not age too well. Sung as a male-female duet, the woman repeatedly insists “I really must go,” to which the male singer retorts, “Baby, it’s cold outside.” But you can tell from the smugness in his voice that he’s really not that concerned about the cold. He wants to get her into his bed. And maybe she... Read More

The Worst Dish of 2017, Reimagined
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Happy End of the Year. It’s that time of looking back at all the highs and lows of 2017. Best-ofs and worst-ofs. Instead of offering my take on the best food books of the year, or ranting again about Gifts Not To Give the Cook, I wanted to try to put a positive spin on one of the worst moments in dining of 2017, according to Eater’s Senior Food Critic, Robert Sietsema. Reviewing... Read More

“Italian Sub” Lasagna
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Late fall, when the heaters turn on and the skies turn gusty and gray, is the start of dinner party season for me. The days of strolling around and sitting down in the park for an impromptu picnic are done for the year. The air conditioners have been deposited to their upper reaches of closets. It’s cozy indoors, and even when you pack a table with twelve guests and blow... Read More

Cassoulet and Rillettes: A Post-Thanksgiving Trip to France
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The greatest Reason For Not Eating Out is having leftovers in the fridge. And the greatest reason for having leftovers in the fridge, of all days of the year, is perhaps Thanksgiving. If you made the requisite roast turkey for the grand dinner, you’re bound to have lots of bits and pieces of turkey meat clinging to the carcass, no matter how much of it you and your family ate. Many cultures can... Read More

Torn Cabbage Salad with Apples and Pecorino
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This dish is part-recipe, part-stress therapy. When I served it as part of a baby shower brunch recently, people kept coming up to ask me a) Was that raw cabbage? and b) How did you cut it? You don’t cut it, I told them. You have to roll up your sleeves and tear it with your bare hands, which I demonstrated by air-tearing. It’s a lot of fun. Read More

Winter Squash Wontons, Two Ways
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A good gourd goes a long way. So does a package of wonton skins. Both ingredients have been known to travel afar, to unlikely juxtapositions and international cuisines. So when you’ve got a lot of them, it’s tempting to try em a number of ways. But how do you know—before you’ve tried it—whether two seemingly disparate ingredients will go together in one dish? Read More

A New Podcast, and Kale Ice Cream
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I’m not sure which is more surprising: hosting a new podcast about food, or making kale ice cream. But they have a lot to do with one another this week. The new podcast is called Why We Eat What We Eat, and the first episode, out tomorrow, tackles the strangely swift rise in popularity of kale. Last weekend, I decided to make kale ice cream, since one of the discussions around the leafy green in... Read More

Chicken and Lime Soup with Corn and Poblano Peppers
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I had an earth-shattering sopa de lima (lime soup) a couple years ago in the Yucatan Peninsula, near Tulum. My friends and I had just swam in a cenote, an underground sinkhole created by the natural collapse of limestone bedrock. After emerging from what felt like a scene in Fraggle Rock, we looked for lunch nearby, and came to a small roadside restaurant. Having not consulted any guidebook or website, we... Read More

Peach Sherbet
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I am not sher what happened to sherbet. As a kid in the 80s and 90s, it was always playing second fiddle to ice cream. It wasn’t pungent like frozen yogurt, which made some people dislike the latter. It wasn’t full-on fruity and as tart as sorbet, its nondairy cousin. And it didn’t have, at least in my recollection, too many fat-free or otherwise health-conscious claims attached to it, whether... Read More

Fried Shrimp with Corn, Tomatoes and Okra
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It’s the season of no recipes needed. In winter, we might pore over splatter-pocked cookbooks, braising a stew or simmering a ragu just the right way. In the summer, things get a lot more loosey-goosey: we unsheathe the barbecue, dig into dirt, invent salads from overflowing refrigerator crispers and lounge around barefoot catching seafood, perhaps. All this fun and the peak quality of seasonal ingredients leads to a quick and effortless... Read More

Songs in the Key of Lime (Tostitos)

posted in: Regrets | 5

Wow.  The other night I experienced a serious lapse in fun, urban foodie-ness and instead became Homer Simpson.  I wouldn’t say it was an all-time low, but it involved eating a dinner of beer and half a bag of Tostitos hint of lime flavored chips.  I’m feeling the pain.  I came home from work to find three friends jamming away on instruments in my tight living room.  Cut to many songs sung, many beer bottles downed, a few hours later, … Read More

Young Pickles and Cold Sesame Noodles

posted in: Recipes, Sides & Salads | 3

Are every woman’s two best summer pals. The kind of friends you forget to call once the season’s over, and almost, regrettably, forget they exist by the time it starts over again. Then you call them like it’s their job to hang out with you, all at once. Poor young pickles and cold sesame noodles! You don’t ever bring them out with you unless you’re going to a barbeque. You are so very selfish.

Reason for Not Eating Out in New York #1: Gimmicks

One of the reasons I don’t eat out anymore: gimmicks that restaurants think are worth a damn but that even the staff doesn’t expect you to buy into. I went to The Living Room last night to see one of my favorite local bands, Matty Charles and the Valentines, who was playing with Austin and Kristin, and Gloria Deluxe. Austin and Kristin totally blew me away. They sounded more polished and professional than anything I’ve seen live in a long … Read More

Summer Corn and Roasted Red Pepper Risotto

posted in: Grains, Recipes, vegetarian | 2

Fresh corn on the cob that squirts you in the face when you snap it in half is just what I was in the mood for when I went to the Fairway Market in Red Hook this weekend. Unfortunately, the two ears I’d gotten with the thought of making corn chowder stayed in my fridge for two days. By Monday it was pretty clear that I wasn’t going to make a hot soup in August, as much as I could … Read More

Cherry Walnut Bruschetta

posted in: Recipes | 3

The great thing about summer is that I can buy produce, well fruit at least, outside my office building from a fruit stand vendor. I have no idea where he trucks his fruit in, but it’s probably somewhere closer than where the average grocery store gets them given how firm and juicy the fruit is. And I love seeing them use those simple scoop-bottomed scales–always so human. Although the figs looked tempting, I opted for some dark, ruby-red cherries because, … Read More

Shark Under Attack

posted in: Ruminations | 4

More on the topic of eating rays and shark-like things, Yao Ming recently stepped up to the plate (darn, wrong sport!) on the topic of wildlife preservation, vowing not to eat shark fin soup. He joins environmentalists who condemn the overfishing of sharks, whose fins are mainly prepared in the traditional, highly expensive delicacy in Chinese cuisine, shark fin soup. Eating shark fin soup has, for thousands of years, denoted a status of wealth and prestige, commonly served at weddings … Read More

Ate a Skate

posted in: Ruminations | 3

I’m still counting down to officially not eating out in New York (or anywhere else, for that matter), pending on my creation of the real website for this blog. So in the meantime, I succumbed to having a dinner out, more or less to escape the heat we’ve had this weekend and eat in a climate that I actually feel hungry in. I went to Dumont with two friends, who both ordered the skirt steak. I wasn’t particularly craving a … Read More

Gonzo for Gazpacho

posted in: Recipes | 2

There are some moments when I almost believe that the New York Times Dining & Wine section reads my mind. And then I take a step back and realize, oh, it’s summer, so that’s why I was thinking of gazpacho, and that’s why the New York Times was, too. Still, before the article had even popped up, which compared two (admittedly unauthentic) recipes of the cold, crisp vegetable slurry, I had already consulted my food gods on the subject: Emeril, … Read More

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